The Way I Hear It – Book Review

“The Way I Hear It,” is a new book by renowned hearing loss advocate Gael Hannan of Toronto. “The way I see it,” is a far more common term, meaning one’s unique perspective, not limited to what one sees with the eyes. Similarly, what we can hear shapes our destiny, which hearing people take for granted, but certainly not those who are hard of hearing. Indeed, miscues and misunderstandings can change our lives and our personalities, to the point where we behave differently when it comes to everyday conversations. It’s a theme that Gael has picked up and...
Our Youth Have Found a New Bad Habit

Our Youth Have Found a New Bad Habit

Kids have been listening to music for as long as we've had music. The difference to day is the prevalence of headphones and volume output of various electronic devices. Years ago, cigarette packaging was used to establish an image, have we done the same with funky new headphones and loud music?

Hearing the Grandchildren

The month of December is always an interesting time in our practice. You wouldn’t think it would be possible to have a rush on hearing aids, but we often do in December. As a young professional I remember thinking this was odd, until I realized the cause … the grandchildren.
World Health Organization- Threat of Recreational Noise

World Health Organization- Threat of Rec...

startling finding that, worldwide, 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults are at risk for hearing loss. This is because, among 12-35 year olds, nearly 50% are exposed to unsafe levels of sound from personal audio devices, including smart phones, and nearly 40% are exposed to unsafe levels of sound from social venues including bars and sporting events.
2 years

2 years

Welcome to our Science of Hearing Blog! We’re almost 2 years old and we’ve had some great fun. Our local audiologists have posted all sorts new perspectives within our field, from Google Glass as a listening device to new hearing related  Apps. We’ve also done a great job of writing new articles on standard hearing related topics such as Tinnitus and Old Misconceptions about Hearing Aids. If you’re looking for something from some better known sources, we’ve re-posted articles from the Globe and Mail, Huffington Posts and ESPN. Based on our...
Noisy Toys – A Warning to Santa

Noisy Toys – A Warning to Santa

Noisy Toys- A Warning to Santa   Christmas is almost upon us! Santa and his Elves must be working tirelessly to wrap up their preparations for the oncoming holiday. However, as Christmas Day rapidly approaches, the audiology community would like to raise a point of concern with Santa (it’s well known that Santa is an active member of the blogosphere, so we felt this was probably the best way to reach him.) Our concern is with the sound output of some toys, and its potentially dangerous effect on the hearing of children who play with them. To help you understand, Santa,...
7 Month Old Reacts to Sound

7 Month Old Reacts to Sound

This is a priceless video showing a young 7 month month old getting new hearing aids. Note that this child does not have a severe to profound hearing loss, but you can decide for yourself if there is benefit. In most western countries these type of events happen in hospitals. Canada, like Australia (in the video) tests children right after they’re born. If kids lag behind in speech development due to hearing loss, we want to catch the problem as young as possible. Developing nations don’t have access to the same services. The Science of Hearing operates a...
Beware of the Cotton Swab – Huffington Post Article

Beware of the Cotton Swab – Huffin...

The Science of Hearing is a group of independently owned hearing clinics from accross Canada. One of the issues we deal with on a daily basis involves impacted wax. This affects our ability to conduct hearing tests or take ear impressions. In many cases the wax is impacted because the patient has been attempting to clean their ears with a cotton swab. The audiologist/hearing instrument specialist can often see the concave imprint in the wax, made by the cotton swab. The best advice is to never put anything smaller than your elbow in your ear. Below is a wonderful article...